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South Korea to end its controversial gaming curfew


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EHW News Editor
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Gamers under 16 in South Korea have a reason to celebrate today: The country plans to end its shutdown law (AKA the Cinderella Law), which prevented underage players from gaming between midnight and 6AM, the Korea Herald reports. When it was introduced in 2011, the law was meant to prevent gaming addiction. At the very least, it gave kids a six-hour block to get some sleep. 

South Korea's Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, as well as the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family, say that they're ending the law to respect children's rights and encourage at-home education. The country aims to abolish the law by the end of the year when it revises its Youth Protection Act.

The news doesn't mean underage gamers are entirely off the hook, though. Instead, excessive gaming will be managed by the country's "choice permit" system, which lets parents and guardians arrange approved play times. Still, that sounds more permissive than China's gaming curfew, which bans players under 18 from playing between 10PM and 8AM. Additionally, they're limited to 90 minutes of game time during weekdays, and three hours on weekends and holidays.

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Gamers under 16 in South Korea have a reason to celebrate today: The country plans to end its shutdown law (AKA the Cinderella Law), which prevented underage players from gaming between midnight and 6AM...

 

I didn't know this was a thing. I guess it's not totally unreasonable for kids under 16 but still, seems like a very strange thing to try to enforce on a governmental level. 

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