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Second major collision in space confirmed by the US


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NU Astrophysicist and Cosmologist Dr Brad Tucker says the “second major collision from two objects in space” has been confirmed after pieces of a Chinese satellite which lost communication were found.

 

Dr Tucker said the first collision in space was in 2009 when an American and a Russian satellite crashed into one another and “produced 10,000 pieces of debris” and the second was this year as was confirmed by the United States Space Force.

 

“In March this year a Chinese satellite lost communication and there was a bit of a debate about what exactly happened,” he told Sky News Australia.

“After some mapping of some objects in that near orbit, they have now picked up multiple pieces, at least six of larger sized pieces of debris from that incident in March from essentially an old rocket booster from the Russians back in 1996.”

 

Dr Tucker said although this has only happened twice satellite collisions are “always a worry” as the Earth will have yet more debris in the atmosphere.

“This is always a worry because as we said there’s a lot of this stuff in space and once you collide, you just produce more bits of debris which float around and can crash into more things,” he said.

WWW.MSN.COM

ANU Astrophysicist and Cosmologist Dr Brad Tucker says the “second major collision from two objects in space” has been confirmed after pieces of a Chinese satellite which lost communication were found.


A Chinese and Russian satellite collided and it went unreported because the two nations are not known for their great international communication practices and also one of them was a spy satellite. One of the main worries with Kessler Syndrome is not just how many objects are in orbit, but having no coordinating amount competing nations to prevent stuff like this from happening. It's entirely possible that within our life times low earth orbit becomes essentially no longer doable. One SpaceX satellite array is maybe manageable, but get 2 or 3 more nations that want to compete with their own version and things will become really messy. 

Edited by UltraMega
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Most satellites are geostationary, their orbit matches the rotation of the earth so the chances of them colliding is slim to none.  It would only happen if they, for whatever reason, lose their orbit. 

 

Spy and maybe weather satellites are probably the only ones that aren't geostationary since you would want to see or communicate with multiple parts of the globe.   But it's likely that they're also geostationary.  I'm sure the US has spy satellites parked over Europe and Asia.

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6 minutes ago, Diffident said:

Most satellites are geostationary, their orbit matches the rotation of the earth so the chances of them colliding is slim to none.  It would only happen if they, for whatever reason, lose their orbit. 

 

Spy and maybe weather satellites are probably the only ones that aren't geostationary since you would want to see or communicate with multiple parts of the globe.   But it's likely that they're also geostationary.  I'm sure the US has spy satellites parked over Europe and Asia.

IDK if most satellites are geostationary, but certainly a lot are. Correct that this only applies to low earth orbit, but that includes all of spaceX, lots of communications satellites, the international space station. 

It's a bit weird to add up though, because higher orbits like geostationary orbits are used for defunct satellites, so a lot of what's there is junk that was in lower orbits but was intentionally put into a graveyard orbit, so if you count defunct satellites there are probably more up there. 

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1 hour ago, GanjaSMK said:

So, who's making the big vacuum to clean up the debris instead of sucking the atmosphere from the planet?

There are design ideas but the problem is there is no funding for it. No one profits from cleaning anything up so no one is seriously working on it. 

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