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IGNORED

Unable to Add Attachment to PM or Post and Kicked Out of Editor


Recommended Posts

--Update--

I also cannot add the guide to a post.  Blocked with the same screen, but upon returning to the thread the content is still in the editor.

 

While attempting to attach a .txt file in a PM, the attacment errored out with a -200 error code forcing me to close the message and then open it again to get rid of the failed attachment.  This worked without issue a few days ago. 

After the attachment failed I than pasted the text into the editor, and after spending quite some time reformatting, I was greeted with the below screen after hitting send. 

Next I fired up a different browser, tried pasting the text into a code block, but I got hit with the same screen, just with a different Cloud Flare Ray ID: 69c425165eddfeaa

 

OS: Arch Linux

Browsers: Chromium and Firefox

Extensions: Disabled while trying to send the PM

 

blocked.png.5a6a945ac925f54d9a388445b722507c.png

Edited by tictoc
Link to comment
  • tictoc changed the title to Unable to Add Attachment to PM or Post and Kicked Out of Editor
  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry I forgot to report back.  I did try it again, but the result was more or less the same.  I will give it another test in this post.

 

*Test 1 with Firefox* With the text pasted into a code block in a spoiler, I was sent to a captcha page, completed the captcha, and then it just kicked me back without submitting the reply.  All of the content was still in the editor.

 

*Test 2 with Firefox* Attaching the .txt file to this post resulted in the same -200 error

 

*Test 3 with Chromium* Attaching the file failed with the -200 error.  Pasting the text into a code block did work after completing a captcha.

 

Spoiler
## Minimal Arch Install for [email protected] on NVIDIA GPUs With fan|clock|voltage Controls ##

--This install pretty much just follows the Arch Wiki Install Guide. I've chosen simple utilities for all the steps and
assumed that you are installing from the terminal and not over ssh--  Arch Wiki Guide: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Arch_install

--Download the ISO and copy it to a USB--  Arch Linux Downloads: https://archlinux.org/download/

--Verify UEFI boot mode--
# ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars  ##If there is any output then you are booted in UEFI mode

--Verify network connection is up and working--
# ip link
# ping archlinux.org

--Update the system clock--
# timedatectl set-ntp true

--Partition, format the disk, and create swapfile--  
    ##Commands assume an empty disk and a basic system with 2 partitions, the EFI system partiton and a root partition
--List disks--
# lsblk
# parted /dev/sdX
(parted) mklabel gpt
(parted) mkpart esp fat32 1MiB 512MiB
(parted) set 1 esp on
(parted) mkpart root ext4 512MiB 45GiB
(parted) quit
--List disks/partitions--
# lsblk
# mkfs.fat -F32 /dev/sdxY   ## (esp)boot_partition
# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdxY ## root_partition

--Mount new partitions--
# mount /dev/root_partition /mnt
# mkdir -p /mnt/boot
# mount /dev/boot_partition /mnt/boot
--Create 4GB swapfile--
# dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/swapfile bs=1M count=4096 status=progress
# chmod 600 /mnt/swapfile
# mkswap /mnt/swapfile
# swapon /mnt/swapfile

--The mirrorlist is now automatically updated once the live iso connects to the internet, so the most recent and fastest https mirrors should be used.  You can double check the configured mirrorlist at /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist--

--Install the base system with the pacstrap script. I've included a number of additional packages that will either be required or just nice to have. Feel free to add anything else you might want.--

# pacstrap /mnt base base-devel linux linux-firmware linux-headers intel-ucode e2fsprogs dosfstools dhcpcd openssh nano vim tmux man-db man-pages texinfo git python pacman-contrib curl wget reflector lm_sensors htop 

--Generate fstab--
# genfstab -U /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab

--Chroot into the system--
# arch-chroot /mnt

--Set localtime and hardware clock--
# ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/Region/City /etc/localtime  ## Check /usr/share/zoneinfo for the list of your local timezone
# hwlock --systohc

--Set locales by editing /etc/locale.gen and uncommenting en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8 and any other necessary locales--
# locale-gen
--Create systemwide locale settings--
# echo "LANG=en_US.UTF-8" > /etc/locale.conf  ## Or create and edit the file if you have additional locales

--Create hostname--
# echo "myHostName" > /etc/hostname

--Create/edit a basic /etc/hosts file and add whatever else you might need--
# nano/vim /etc/hosts

127.0.0.1	localhost
::1		localhost
127.0.1.1	myHostName

--Basic DHCP default wired network assumes a dhcp server is already running on the network.  If anything more is necessary there is a pretty extensive guide on the Arch Wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Network_configuration--

--Get network interface names--
# ip link
--Enable the default interface--
# ip link set defaultInterface up
--Check that the interface is enabled--
# ip link show dev defaultInterface
--Start dhcpcd service for the default interface--
# systemctl enable --now [email protected]

--Create new initramfs.  Shouldn't need to do this, but it doesn't hurt--
# mkinitcpio -P linux

--Set root password--
# passwd

--Install and configure a boot loader.  systemd-boot used in the example below.  Super simple configuration, and it will also list the Windows boot on the boot menu--

--Verify UEFI boot mode--
# ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars
--Install systemd-boot--
# bootctl install

--Create and configure boot loader configuration and default loader-- Full loader config options: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Systemd-boot#Loader_configuration
/boot/loader/loader.conf
default	arch.conf
timeout	3

/boot/loader/entries/arch.conf
title   Arch Linux
linux   /vmlinuz-linux
initrd  /intel-ucode.img
initrd  /initramfs-linux.img
options root=PARTUUID= rw sysrq_always_enabled=1
    ##PARTUUID for root partition can be found with: $ blkid
    ##sysrq is disabled on Arch, and sysrq_always_enabled=1 is not required, but for my home systems I like having

--Exit chroot and reboot--
# umount -R /mnt
# reboot    
--remove installation iso--

--Log in to the new system as root--

--Add a standard new user and add the user to convenient/necessary groups. The video group shouldn't still be necessary for NVIDIDA but it won't break anything.  The default shell on Arch is bash, install additional shells and adjust user default as necessary--

# useradd -m newUser -G video,wheel
--Configure password for newUser--
# passwd newUser

--Set up sudo for the new user.  Should use the default editor (visudo) for the sudoers file, but we have a few editors installed so you could use EDITOR=nano/vim visudo--
# visudo 
    ##Uncomment %wheel ALL=(ALL) ALL to give members of the wheel group permission to execute any command with sudo and the user's password  

--Set up openssh. Edit /etc/ssh/sshd_config to disable clear text passwords, allow public keys, set ports, allow users, etc.  Arch doesn't enable the openssh service by default, so after editing the config the service will need to be started and conifgured to run at boot.--
--Run sshd in test mode to make sure the service will start without errors--
$ sudo sshd -t
--Start the sshd.service and enable it to start at boot--
$ sudo systemctl enable --now sshd.service

--Reboot the system and then login as the newly created user--
$ reboot

--Update system and install nvidia packages--
$ sudo pacman -Syu nvidia nvidia-dkms nvidia-utils opencl-nvidia cuda nvidia-settings xorg-server-devel
$ reboot

--Create empty xorg.conf with fan, clock, and voltage control enabled--
$ sudo nvidia-xconfig -a --cool-bits=28 --allow-empty-initial-configuration --enable-all-gpus
$ reboot

--To control GPU fans, clocks, performance modes, etc. a minimal xserver needs to be running. If all values are flashed to a custom BIOS then there is no need to run an X server--

--Install minimal packages to use startx, .xinitrc, or lightdm--
$ sudo pacman -S xorg-xinit lightdm

--To set GPU clocks, fans, and any other nvidia-settings commands a minimal xserver must be running. lightdm can serve this purpose, alternatively scripts could be used to run the necessary commands with xinit--
$ sudo systemctl enable --now lightdm
$ reboot

--Login from the tty or over ssh and OC GPU.  There are ways to do this without being root, but with a minimal install and nothing else running on the system, I just use root--
$ su
# export DISPLAY=:0
# export XAUTHORITY=/var/run/lightdm/root/:0

--Set fan speed, OC GPU, or use any other nvidia-settings--  List of most of the options: $ man nvidia-settings
# nvidia-settings -q fans
# nvidia-settings -a [gpu:0]/GPUFanControlState=1 -a [fan:0]/GPUTargetFanSpeed=XX
    ##Some GPUs will have multiple fan controllers, repeat command changing the fan number for any additional fans

--Set GPU core and memory clock offsets--
# nvidia-settings -c :0 -a '[gpu:0]/GPUGraphicsClockOffset[4]=XX'  ## Depending on the GPU you might need to change [4] to [3] or [2] 
# nvidia-settings -c :0 -a '[gpu:0]/GPUMemoryTransferRateOffset[4]=XXX'

--Enable persistence mode and set max power limit-- Full list of nvidia-smi options: $ man nvidia-smi
# nvidia-smi -pm 1  ##Persistence mode will keep all power limit settings active regardless of whether there is an app running on the GPU
--Find and set max power limit--
# nvidia-smi -q | grep 'Max Power Limit'
# nvidia-smi -pl XXX

--Exit root shell--
# exit

--Most remote monitoring utilities can hook into nvidia-smi to get GPU stats--
--Easy command to monitor live GPU stats from the terminal or to log to a file--  Full list of dmon options: $ nvidia-smi dmon --help
$ nvidia-smi dmon

--Install and configure [email protected]-
[email protected] is not in the default repos, and it will need to be installed from the AUR--

--Make a directory for AUR packages--
    ## We only need one package from the AUR, so just a simple folder for AUR packages will work
$ mkdir ~/aur
$ cd aur
--Use git to grab the source files from the AUR--
$ git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/foldingathome.git  ##Arch Wiki [email protected] - https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/[email protected]
--Make and install foldingathome--
    ## All of the dependecies are in the main repos, so pacman will grab anything that it needs
$ cd foldingathome
$ makepkg -sci  ## Makepkg info: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Makepkg

--Configure [email protected]
$ cd /etc/foldingathome
# FAHClient --configure
    ## Further configuration can be done from the command line, by hand with an already configured config, or from FAHControl on a remote machine

----Example Configuration w/ one GPU, additional passkey for ETF, and passwordless access from localhost/LAN (adjust ip addresses as necessary) for HFM and FAHControl *note* [email protected] will bail if there are any syntax or line spacing errors in a hand prepared config.xml----
<config>
  <!-- Folding Core -->
  <checkpoint v='10'/>

  <!-- Folding Slot Configuration -->
  <smp v='false'/>

  <!-- HTTP Server -->
  <allow v='0.0.0.0/0,127.0.0.1 192.168.0.0/24'/>

  <!-- Logging -->
  <verbosity v='5'/>

  <!-- Network -->
  <proxy v=':8080'/>

  <!-- Remote Command Server -->
  <command-allow-no-pass v='0.0.0.0/0,127.0.0.1 192.168.0.0/24'/>

  <!-- Slot Control -->
  <pause-on-battery v='false'/>
  <power v='full'/>

  <!-- User Information -->
  <passkey v='XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'/>
  <team v='239902'/>
  <user v='username'/>

  <!-- Work Unit Control -->
  <next-unit-percentage v='98'/>

  <!-- Folding Slots -->
  <slot id='0' type='GPU'>
    <passkey v='XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'/>
    <paused v='False'/>
  </slot>
</config>


--Since Arch doesn't enable most systemd units by default, the foldingathome-nvidia.service should be enabled to run at boot, but the actual foldingathome.service can either be enabled to run at boot or it can just be started manually--
--Run [email protected] at boot--
$ sudo systemctl enable --now foldingathome-nvidia.service
    ## Recent changes to the [email protected] package run the service in a somewhat more secure way.  One consequence of that, is that there were issues with the client and NVIDIA GPU detection. There is a 60 second wait in the foldingathome-nvidia.service to ensure that NVIDIA GPUs are recognized and the foldingathome.service will only run after the nvidia.service
$ sudo systemctl enable --now foldingathom.service

--Misc commands to control the [email protected] client--
$ sudo systemctl stop foldingathome  ## Shuts down the [email protected] client
$ sudo systemctl start foldingathome  ## Starts the [email protected] client if it is not auto-started at boot or if the client was shutdown
$ FAHClient --send-pause  ## Pauses all slots
$ FAHClient --send-unpause  ## Resumes all slots
$ FAHClient --send-finish  ## Finishes current WUs and pauses all slots
    ## Append the slot number after the command to control individual slots e.g. $ FAHClient --send-pause 01
$ journalctl -b0 -u foldingathome  ## Prints the [email protected] log from the current boot to the terminal with less
$ journalctl -f -u foldingathome  ## Follows the [email protected] log and prints newlines to the terminal
$ journalctl -b0 -u foldingathome -g nan ## Searches the [email protected] log from the current boot for nan errors.  Helpful to diagnose a not quite stable OC.  Can be compared to power usage and/or temperature logs to narrow down the cause of the errors


--Maintenance should be pretty minimal unless NVIDIA blows up the driver.  The [email protected] client rarely gets updated, so it's really just a matter of running pacman -Syu every few weeks and rebooting. Maybe check the Arch News Feed: https://archlinux.org/news/ for any actual breaking bugs before updating, but other than that it should just fold away.--

 

 

Edited by tictoc
Link to comment
2 hours ago, tictoc said:

Sorry I forgot to report back.  I did try it again, but the result was more or less the same.  I will give it another test in this post.

 

*Test 1 with Firefox* With the text pasted into a code block in a spoiler, I was sent to a captcha page, completed the captcha, and then it just kicked me back without submitting the reply.  All of the content was still in the editor.

 

*Test 2 with Firefox* Attaching the .txt file to this post resulted in the same -200 error

 

*Test 3 with Chromium* Attaching the file failed with the -200 error.  Pasting the text into a code block did work after completing a captcha.

 

  Hide contents
## Minimal Arch Install for [email protected] on NVIDIA GPUs With fan|clock|voltage Controls ##

--This install pretty much just follows the Arch Wiki Install Guide. I've chosen simple utilities for all the steps and
assumed that you are installing from the terminal and not over ssh--  Arch Wiki Guide: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Arch_install

--Download the ISO and copy it to a USB--  Arch Linux Downloads: https://archlinux.org/download/

--Verify UEFI boot mode--
# ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars  ##If there is any output then you are booted in UEFI mode

--Verify network connection is up and working--
# ip link
# ping archlinux.org

--Update the system clock--
# timedatectl set-ntp true

--Partition, format the disk, and create swapfile--  
    ##Commands assume an empty disk and a basic system with 2 partitions, the EFI system partiton and a root partition
--List disks--
# lsblk
# parted /dev/sdX
(parted) mklabel gpt
(parted) mkpart esp fat32 1MiB 512MiB
(parted) set 1 esp on
(parted) mkpart root ext4 512MiB 45GiB
(parted) quit
--List disks/partitions--
# lsblk
# mkfs.fat -F32 /dev/sdxY   ## (esp)boot_partition
# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdxY ## root_partition

--Mount new partitions--
# mount /dev/root_partition /mnt
# mkdir -p /mnt/boot
# mount /dev/boot_partition /mnt/boot
--Create 4GB swapfile--
# dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/swapfile bs=1M count=4096 status=progress
# chmod 600 /mnt/swapfile
# mkswap /mnt/swapfile
# swapon /mnt/swapfile

--The mirrorlist is now automatically updated once the live iso connects to the internet, so the most recent and fastest https mirrors should be used.  You can double check the configured mirrorlist at /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist--

--Install the base system with the pacstrap script. I've included a number of additional packages that will either be required or just nice to have. Feel free to add anything else you might want.--

# pacstrap /mnt base base-devel linux linux-firmware linux-headers intel-ucode e2fsprogs dosfstools dhcpcd openssh nano vim tmux man-db man-pages texinfo git python pacman-contrib curl wget reflector lm_sensors htop 

--Generate fstab--
# genfstab -U /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab

--Chroot into the system--
# arch-chroot /mnt

--Set localtime and hardware clock--
# ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/Region/City /etc/localtime  ## Check /usr/share/zoneinfo for the list of your local timezone
# hwlock --systohc

--Set locales by editing /etc/locale.gen and uncommenting en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8 and any other necessary locales--
# locale-gen
--Create systemwide locale settings--
# echo "LANG=en_US.UTF-8" > /etc/locale.conf  ## Or create and edit the file if you have additional locales

--Create hostname--
# echo "myHostName" > /etc/hostname

--Create/edit a basic /etc/hosts file and add whatever else you might need--
# nano/vim /etc/hosts

127.0.0.1	localhost
::1		localhost
127.0.1.1	myHostName

--Basic DHCP default wired network assumes a dhcp server is already running on the network.  If anything more is necessary there is a pretty extensive guide on the Arch Wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Network_configuration--

--Get network interface names--
# ip link
--Enable the default interface--
# ip link set defaultInterface up
--Check that the interface is enabled--
# ip link show dev defaultInterface
--Start dhcpcd service for the default interface--
# systemctl enable --now [email protected]

--Create new initramfs.  Shouldn't need to do this, but it doesn't hurt--
# mkinitcpio -P linux

--Set root password--
# passwd

--Install and configure a boot loader.  systemd-boot used in the example below.  Super simple configuration, and it will also list the Windows boot on the boot menu--

--Verify UEFI boot mode--
# ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars
--Install systemd-boot--
# bootctl install

--Create and configure boot loader configuration and default loader-- Full loader config options: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Systemd-boot#Loader_configuration
/boot/loader/loader.conf
default	arch.conf
timeout	3

/boot/loader/entries/arch.conf
title   Arch Linux
linux   /vmlinuz-linux
initrd  /intel-ucode.img
initrd  /initramfs-linux.img
options root=PARTUUID= rw sysrq_always_enabled=1
    ##PARTUUID for root partition can be found with: $ blkid
    ##sysrq is disabled on Arch, and sysrq_always_enabled=1 is not required, but for my home systems I like having

--Exit chroot and reboot--
# umount -R /mnt
# reboot    
--remove installation iso--

--Log in to the new system as root--

--Add a standard new user and add the user to convenient/necessary groups. The video group shouldn't still be necessary for NVIDIDA but it won't break anything.  The default shell on Arch is bash, install additional shells and adjust user default as necessary--

# useradd -m newUser -G video,wheel
--Configure password for newUser--
# passwd newUser

--Set up sudo for the new user.  Should use the default editor (visudo) for the sudoers file, but we have a few editors installed so you could use EDITOR=nano/vim visudo--
# visudo 
    ##Uncomment %wheel ALL=(ALL) ALL to give members of the wheel group permission to execute any command with sudo and the user's password  

--Set up openssh. Edit /etc/ssh/sshd_config to disable clear text passwords, allow public keys, set ports, allow users, etc.  Arch doesn't enable the openssh service by default, so after editing the config the service will need to be started and conifgured to run at boot.--
--Run sshd in test mode to make sure the service will start without errors--
$ sudo sshd -t
--Start the sshd.service and enable it to start at boot--
$ sudo systemctl enable --now sshd.service

--Reboot the system and then login as the newly created user--
$ reboot

--Update system and install nvidia packages--
$ sudo pacman -Syu nvidia nvidia-dkms nvidia-utils opencl-nvidia cuda nvidia-settings xorg-server-devel
$ reboot

--Create empty xorg.conf with fan, clock, and voltage control enabled--
$ sudo nvidia-xconfig -a --cool-bits=28 --allow-empty-initial-configuration --enable-all-gpus
$ reboot

--To control GPU fans, clocks, performance modes, etc. a minimal xserver needs to be running. If all values are flashed to a custom BIOS then there is no need to run an X server--

--Install minimal packages to use startx, .xinitrc, or lightdm--
$ sudo pacman -S xorg-xinit lightdm

--To set GPU clocks, fans, and any other nvidia-settings commands a minimal xserver must be running. lightdm can serve this purpose, alternatively scripts could be used to run the necessary commands with xinit--
$ sudo systemctl enable --now lightdm
$ reboot

--Login from the tty or over ssh and OC GPU.  There are ways to do this without being root, but with a minimal install and nothing else running on the system, I just use root--
$ su
# export DISPLAY=:0
# export XAUTHORITY=/var/run/lightdm/root/:0

--Set fan speed, OC GPU, or use any other nvidia-settings--  List of most of the options: $ man nvidia-settings
# nvidia-settings -q fans
# nvidia-settings -a [gpu:0]/GPUFanControlState=1 -a [fan:0]/GPUTargetFanSpeed=XX
    ##Some GPUs will have multiple fan controllers, repeat command changing the fan number for any additional fans

--Set GPU core and memory clock offsets--
# nvidia-settings -c :0 -a '[gpu:0]/GPUGraphicsClockOffset[4]=XX'  ## Depending on the GPU you might need to change [4] to [3] or [2] 
# nvidia-settings -c :0 -a '[gpu:0]/GPUMemoryTransferRateOffset[4]=XXX'

--Enable persistence mode and set max power limit-- Full list of nvidia-smi options: $ man nvidia-smi
# nvidia-smi -pm 1  ##Persistence mode will keep all power limit settings active regardless of whether there is an app running on the GPU
--Find and set max power limit--
# nvidia-smi -q | grep 'Max Power Limit'
# nvidia-smi -pl XXX

--Exit root shell--
# exit

--Most remote monitoring utilities can hook into nvidia-smi to get GPU stats--
--Easy command to monitor live GPU stats from the terminal or to log to a file--  Full list of dmon options: $ nvidia-smi dmon --help
$ nvidia-smi dmon

--Install and configure [email protected]
[email protected] is not in the default repos, and it will need to be installed from the AUR--

--Make a directory for AUR packages--
    ## We only need one package from the AUR, so just a simple folder for AUR packages will work
$ mkdir ~/aur
$ cd aur
--Use git to grab the source files from the AUR--
$ git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/foldingathome.git  ##Arch Wiki [email protected] - https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/[email protected]
--Make and install foldingathome--
    ## All of the dependecies are in the main repos, so pacman will grab anything that it needs
$ cd foldingathome
$ makepkg -sci  ## Makepkg info: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Makepkg

--Configure [email protected]
$ cd /etc/foldingathome
# FAHClient --configure
    ## Further configuration can be done from the command line, by hand with an already configured config, or from FAHControl on a remote machine

----Example Configuration w/ one GPU, additional passkey for ETF, and passwordless access from localhost/LAN (adjust ip addresses as necessary) for HFM and FAHControl *note* [email protected] will bail if there are any syntax or line spacing errors in a hand prepared config.xml----
<config>
  <!-- Folding Core -->
  <checkpoint v='10'/>

  <!-- Folding Slot Configuration -->
  <smp v='false'/>

  <!-- HTTP Server -->
  <allow v='0.0.0.0/0,127.0.0.1 192.168.0.0/24'/>

  <!-- Logging -->
  <verbosity v='5'/>

  <!-- Network -->
  <proxy v=':8080'/>

  <!-- Remote Command Server -->
  <command-allow-no-pass v='0.0.0.0/0,127.0.0.1 192.168.0.0/24'/>

  <!-- Slot Control -->
  <pause-on-battery v='false'/>
  <power v='full'/>

  <!-- User Information -->
  <passkey v='XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'/>
  <team v='239902'/>
  <user v='username'/>

  <!-- Work Unit Control -->
  <next-unit-percentage v='98'/>

  <!-- Folding Slots -->
  <slot id='0' type='GPU'>
    <passkey v='XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'/>
    <paused v='False'/>
  </slot>
</config>


--Since Arch doesn't enable most systemd units by default, the foldingathome-nvidia.service should be enabled to run at boot, but the actual foldingathome.service can either be enabled to run at boot or it can just be started manually--
--Run [email protected] at boot--
$ sudo systemctl enable --now foldingathome-nvidia.service
    ## Recent changes to the [email protected] package run the service in a somewhat more secure way.  One consequence of that, is that there were issues with the client and NVIDIA GPU detection. There is a 60 second wait in the foldingathome-nvidia.service to ensure that NVIDIA GPUs are recognized and the foldingathome.service will only run after the nvidia.service
$ sudo systemctl enable --now foldingathom.service

--Misc commands to control the [email protected] client--
$ sudo systemctl stop foldingathome  ## Shuts down the [email protected] client
$ sudo systemctl start foldingathome  ## Starts the [email protected] client if it is not auto-started at boot or if the client was shutdown
$ FAHClient --send-pause  ## Pauses all slots
$ FAHClient --send-unpause  ## Resumes all slots
$ FAHClient --send-finish  ## Finishes current WUs and pauses all slots
    ## Append the slot number after the command to control individual slots e.g. $ FAHClient --send-pause 01
$ journalctl -b0 -u foldingathome  ## Prints the [email protected] log from the current boot to the terminal with less
$ journalctl -f -u foldingathome  ## Follows the [email protected] log and prints newlines to the terminal
$ journalctl -b0 -u foldingathome -g nan ## Searches the [email protected] log from the current boot for nan errors.  Helpful to diagnose a not quite stable OC.  Can be compared to power usage and/or temperature logs to narrow down the cause of the errors


--Maintenance should be pretty minimal unless NVIDIA blows up the driver.  The [email protected] client rarely gets updated, so it's really just a matter of running pacman -Syu every few weeks and rebooting. Maybe check the Arch News Feed: https://archlinux.org/news/ for any actual breaking bugs before updating, but other than that it should just fold away.--

 

 

Thanks for the feedback bud. Could you re-screenshot the error ? Just so we can reference log files our end and investigate further.

Link to comment
10 minutes ago, tictoc said:

 

Evil Linux h4x0|2 😆

 

Thanks for looking into it E, and archiving similar files is an easy workaround. 👍

Darn Linux users ruining it for everyone 😛  No problems. Most txt uploads will work but once assume it is the commands etc inside the txt file the firewall simply does not like, I mean it makes sense. 

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